Author Archives: Aaron

Mourne Seven Sevens Race 2019 – Final Instructions

Phone Number – 07845 659503
Give your Name and Entry Number in all messages
In an emergency dial 999 ask for Police then Mountain Rescue

BARF welcomes you to the Mourne Seven Sevens Race. This event is run under FRA and NIMRA rules for fell races and is a NIMRA Championship event categorised as A-Long – Minimum age 18 years old. To compete in the race you must be an experienced fell runner and be fit enough for the distance, climb and terrain involved. The exact route is not fixed and is not way-marked at any stage. Navigational skills will be required, especially if weather conditions are poor so participants must have the ability and experience to use both map and compass. (Navigation using only a smartphone app is not allowed).

Registration opens on Saturday morning at 08:45 and closes at 09:40 at the north end of the playing field beside Donard car park in Newcastle. The car park is free but parking may be limited due to other events. Please car share if possible and allow time to find parking nearby. 

You will need to fill out a FRA Race Registration form with details of your car registration and emergency contact info etc.

You will be given a set of green plastic tabs and one small white tab with your entry number on each of them. For convenience they will be held together on a string. You will also receive an electronic timing chip (aka dibber) which will be fastened to your wrist. Please look after this as you will be charged £30 if you lose it.

Timing Chip (dibber)

The Start  – of the race is in the playing field at 10:00am sharp.

There will be a funnel into the Start Pen and ALL RUNNERS WILL BE GEAR CHECKED. We will also activate your Dibber at this point.

At each summit you will find an electronic SI Control Box on a post with an orange and white flag. Insert your dibber into the hole in the SI box and wait till you hear a beep. The dibber will now have recorded the time you arrived at the top. (Click here for more info on the timing system). There are five marshalled positions along the route in the cols between summits and at Ben Crom dam. Remove one green plastic tab from the string and hand it to the marshal at each of these positions.

At the Finish, hand in your dibber and the last (white) plastic tab. You will receive a print out of your progress around the route with split times for each summit. The white plastic tab is our way of checking that you are off the hills, so even if you fail to complete the walk please make sure that you come to see us at the finish and hand in any remaining tabs and the dibber.

Light refreshments and showers will be available from 12:00. Please bring a cup so we can reduce waste.

Finishers’ times will be streamed live to http://lvo.org.uk/liveresults throughout the day. We will also have live data from several checkpoints around the course which we will publish snapshots of onto Facebook page through the day so your friends and family can monitor your progress.
Route: The route is anti-clockwise around each of the seven summits which must be visited in the order stipulated below plus the marshalled checkpoints (denoted MCP below). N.B. The Controls on Commedagh and Meelmore are now at the Summit Cairns and not at the Shelter Towers on the wall.

Cut-off time: There are cut-off times of 12.00 at Donard-Commedagh Col and of 2:30pm at Ben Crom Dam. This is to ensure runners complete the route before dark. Runners missing either cut-off will be retired from the race and should return directly to Donard Park. N.B. Retirements are marked RTD on the results with no times.  

In the event of extreme weather conditions the route may be altered on the day. Marshalled Check Points may have to be moved for their safety but Control Boxes will remain in place.

Retirees at any stage of the event must report as soon as possible to a marshal or via text to base and return directly to Donard Park to register that they are safely off the mountains and to return their dibber and tags.

The Mourne Rambler Bus (Service 405) does a loop of the eastern Mournes every couple of hours. See https://www.translink.co.uk/timetables for info.  

Equipment, food and water: The event is not supported along the route. Participants must carry minimum MANDATORY kit listed below:

  • Trail shoes or fell shoes (no trainers)
  • Waterproof coat with hood  &  waterproof trousers
  • Hat & gloves
  • Foil space blanket (a foil bag better)
  • Map of the course, compass & whistle
  • Emergency rations

Please be aware that for long sections of the course there is no water so plan accordingly

These items are required regardless of the weather forecast as mountain conditions can change dramatically with very little warning. 

Leave No Trace – This event subscribes to the LNT ethos and the NI Countryside Code: – Use stiles to cross fences and walls, leave gates as you find them and please bring ALL your rubbish home.

Mourne Seven Sevens 2019

This year’s Mourne Sevens Seven’s Race on the 10th August will start from its traditional start at the Pavilion in Donard Park as Shimna College is unavailable. The race will be held in conjunction with the annual challenge walk and will be in an anticlockwise direction, which is Slieve Donard and Commedagh first followed by Bernagh, the Meels, Bencrom Dam, Binnian, Lamagan then back to the finish line in Donard Park. Marshals will be at the cols between Donard / Commedagh, Hares gap, Meelmore/ MeelBeg, The Dam and Binnian/Lamagan which you check into after completing Binnian.

It will be an entry on the day race costing £10.00 for registered runners (£11.00 unregistered) and entry’s will be taken from 8.00am until 9.40am. The race will start at 10.00 promptly. Please do not enter the race if you are a walker who has failed to get an entry for the walk, as there are cut off times which you will fail to make unless you are running. The main cut off time is 14.30 at the Ben Crom Dam which is half way round the route. I have decided to have a second cut off time of 12.00 at the col between Slieve Donard and Slieve Commedagh, as anybody going at that pace is unlikely to make the Dam cut off time.

When you enter the race you will be issued with a set of green plastic tabs and an electronic Si dibber. Insert the dipper into the control boxes on the Summits and at the Dam to record your times. Hand a green tab to each group of marshals you pass and this way we know exactly where you have been. At the finish hand in the dipper and your last remaining plastic tab which will be a small white one.

This is the longest toughest race on the NIMRA calendar so come prepared for any eventuality. Full waterproof kit, gloves and hat must be carried together with map, compass, whistle and food. We would recommend that a space blanket or better still the bag version is carried as it could save your life if you go down injured in bad weather conditions – yes we have previously dealt with hypothermia cases during this event in beautiful summery August….. So as I said before, be ready for any eventuality.  If the weather forecast is for hot conditions, remember that water is in short supply for long sections of the route so plan accordingly. If you are carrying a phone the emergency event number is 07802 691540.

All the best with your preparations and if you are not running but are available to help out please get in touch as it is always a challenge getting enough helpers to ensure the success of the event.

Jim Brown.

Annalong Horseshoe Report

After 37 years of the annual Annalong Horseshoe Fell Race being run from the driveway at Dunnywater, the event moved to a new location at the nearby NI Water Silent Valley complex for this year’s running of the event. This necessitated a change to the traditional route, adding both distance and climb, but given the benefits of a building to act as race HQ, toilet facilities for all participants, omitting the increasing risks associated with the public road section and ample car parking.

The weather on race day was dull and overcast, cloud covering the majority of the peaks on the race route. Pre-race discussion was all about the second half of the race and the route to the finish, both additions to the old course.

67 nervous souls toed the start line for the 3 mile run along the tarmac access road to the first checkpoint and out onto the open mountain. A few were later to regret their attempt at a parkrun PB at this stage of the race. Timmy Johnson of Mourne Runners was straight into the lead, with Mark Stephens of Newcastle AC deciding to keep pace with him, not wanting to concede any advantage. Johnston reached the first checkpoint in the lead, with Stephens seconds behind. Onto the first climb to Lamagan summit and it was Stephens ever so slightly in front, Johnson right on his heels in second. Although the summits were shrouded in mist with very little visibility, few navigational mistakes were being made over the first section of the race.

Stephens continued to lead Johnston over Cove and Commedagh summits by only a few seconds but started to pull ahead by a minute at the top of Slieve Donard, the highest point on the race course. At the next checkpoint on Chimney Rock, Stephens had extended his advantage over Johnston to just over two minutes.

Behind the leading pair, a five-way battle for 3rd place was taking place. Neil Andrews of East Down was holding onto 3rd place, with Shane Lynch, Clive Bailey of Mourne Runners and cousins Stephens and William Shields in close proximity.

In the ladies race, Gillian Wasson had started off at a fast pace to be the leading lady over the first section of the race, but Ciara Largy had caught up by the 3rd checkpoint on Cove and gradually started to pull away. Ciara continued to add to her lead over the section from Chimney Rock to Binian, using her orienteering skills to good effect. Ciara held her advantage to finish as first lady in 23rd position overall, Gillian Wasson finishing second with a fast-finishing Lynne Spence holding off her Mourne Runners club mate Karalee Porter for third place.

From Chimney Rock, Stephens used his orienteering skills to his advantage, pulling away from Johnston in the mist. Johnston started feeling the strain on the ascent of Binian, giving up on the chase for second, stopping for 10 minutes to eat and drink the remaining contents within his rucksack before finishing the climb to the Binian checkpoint. Mark Stephens was first across the finish line in a very creditable time of 2:38, Timmy Johnston finishing in second place 14 minutes behind in 2:52.

Behind the leading pair, Andrews was holding 3rd place at Chimney Rock, a minute ahead of the four-person chasing pack behind. On the next leg to Binnian, former Mourne Mountain Marathon winner and ultra specialist Lynch used his endurance strength to pull away and draw slightly ahead of Andrews at the checkpoint, extending his lead on the rough downhill section to the finish by over three minutes, finishing in 2:57.

Meanwhile, behind the leading groups, plenty of drama was happening due to the poor visibility. One pair reached checkpoint 2 on Lamagan, promptly got lost on the way to checkpoint 3, ended up back at the bottom of Lamagan, at the point which they had started their climb, then went to the last checkpoint on Binian, before jogged into the finish. Another runner reached checkpoint 4 on Commedagh, only to get lost on the way to the Donard Commedagh saddle, ending up in Newcastle and cadging a lift back to the finish in Silent Valley. The various route choices from Chimney Rock to Binnian and then to the finish line provided plenty of discussion at the finish.

Ciara Largy’s achievement in winning the ladies race deserves special mention as it means that Ciara now has the distinction of holding the Ladies course records for both the old course and the new course at the same time.

After ‘retiring’ from mountain running, former multiple British Veteran Fell Running champion Jim Patterson made a welcome return to racing again. Even at the age of 72, over half the field was behind him at the finish, as he finished in 30th place overall, winning the MV60 age category. In no way was Jim decision to race prejudiced by the race organisers offer of a free race entry to over 65’s!

We also had a visitor from London taking part in his first Northern Ireland mountain race, his local training ground being Richmond Park, which certainly contains none of the terrain that he faced on Binnian today!

At the finish, all runners enjoyed the post-race refreshments provided by the B.A.R.F. hosts. Prizes were distributed by B.A.R.F. member Ian Taylor, in his position as President of NI Athletics. Ian has completed 33 of the 38 Annalong Horseshoe races held to date, unfortunately having to miss this year’s event due to injury.

Many thanks to all who participated, organised and assisted in the race. Special thanks to NI Water for permitting the use of the Silent Valley complex for our use.

Rocky vs BARF

This weeks Hill and Dale race was Rocky Mountain starting in Leitrim Lodge . 11 hardy BARF runners lined up to take the loop race with a fast descent back to the finish . First home for the club was Colin Pascoe in 37.02 and 13 th overall .

Rónán Davison-Kernan finished in 40.12, Jim Brown 41.31,Paddy Mallon 43.03,Stephanie Pruzina 46.16,Andy Bridge 49.25, Mark Pruzina 49.58, Trevor Wilson 50.36 , Phil Ward 52.59, Gary Longridge 53.32 and Stephen Waterworth 1.05.

A great summers evening running by all and superb effort on a great course with over two hundred taking part …pics by P Fegan ……well done Barfers ! Arf ! Arf !

Route Changes for the 2019 Annalong Horseshoe!

This year’s Annalong Horseshoe Fell Race will forsake its base for the last 37 years at Dunnywater and will now start and finish at Silent Valley Reservoir, within the NI Water complex.

The number of entrants last year put severe pressure on the existing facilities at Dunnywater and it’s felt that rather than limit the number of entrants, a move to a new location would solve the current issues with the Dunnywater venue. Last year we had a record entry of 100 runners, which meant that we struggled to accommodate parking for the number of competitors vehicles along the Dunnywater avenue, causing complaints from the residents on the avenue regarding access. With an increase in competitors, the lack of toilet facilities and the health and safety risks associated with the road section also raising concerns, therefore it’s a logical move to Silent Valley, which will address all of these issues for this year and years to come. Continue reading

Turkey Trot 2018 – Report & Results

View the full race results here > http://bit.ly/barfturkeytrot2018

Mild Weather, Hot pace.

Seamus Lynch

This must have been the mildest weather ever for the annual Turkey Trot race, in total contrast to the pace at the front end of the race which was seriously hot. Five runners broke away, almost from the starting gun and were already well clear by the time they reached Parnell’s Bridge. After racing to the Trassey Track and climbing to the high point of the course at the style on Slievenaglogh it was Edinburgh based, Carnethy Hill Runner Eoin Lennon who had developed a 30m lead over last year’s winner Seamus Lynch with the other three runners just a short distance behind. The descent from the Hares gap turned out to be the decisive moment of the race where Seamus local knowledge provided him with the better line back down onto the Trassey Track to gain the lead which he held all the way back to the Mountain Centre finish line. East Downs Aaron Mc Grady was just two minutes shy of the winning time with former winner Paul Pruzina and Mark Stephens just a handful of seconds further behind. Continue reading

Last One Standing – Club Social

On Sunday 2nd December, members descended on Castlewellan Forest Park for a Last One Standing format social event. Starting at 7 am, runners would start an undulating 7Km (4.4m) figure-of-eight lap around the forest and lake. With a total of 10 official laps, the event would finish at 5pm!

The day started with Aaron arriving 30 minutes early and me (Gerry) 2 minutes before the off. Aaron and I were the only two on the first lap needing headtorches until about 7.30am. Continue reading

Seven Sevens Report 2018

Heaven for Hell – and Hicks as well.

I had thought that the weather was going to be good for the runners this year with light winds forecast, no rain and mild temperatures, but in the event it was the humidity which sapped the competitors strength. Many a challenge floundered on the slopes of the Meels, as cramp set into legs fatigued by the long slog up from the dam over rough ground, without hardly a breath of wind to disturb the stifling air. It was a long day for many but for me it was actually a short day, as there was no associated walking event to provide late finishing weary walkers, stumbling  through the Donard woods as darkness descended.
Continue reading